blog_pullquote_classycontributor
Contributing Author

Communicable Disease Services: CLASSY Awards Top 5

Communicable Disease programs provide prevention methods, treatment and access to treatment for those suffering from contagious and easily-transmitted diseases like HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Polio. Communicable diseases can be transmitted from animals or the environment to people or from person to person. View the key indicators of this subcategory here.


Tuberculosis Detection by Trained Hero Rats
APOPO Hero Rats
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING According to the WHO, every year about 9 million people develop tuberculosis (TB), causing 1.4M deaths in 2012 worldwide. In Tanzania, TB is the third major cause of morbidity and mortality after malaria and HIV/AIDS. Compounding the problem, the case detection rate is low due to the lack of an adequate diagnostic method. A simple, fast, and accurate diagnostic tool is sorely lacking.

[su_pullquote align=”right” class=”top5″]Tuberculosis Detection by Trained Hero Rats
Program Name

Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania
Location

2005
Start date

Dr. Negussie Beyene
Program Director

@HeroRATs[/su_pullquote]

APOPO has developed a scent-detection technology using Giant African Pouched Rats as a simple, fast, inexpensive, and accurate diagnostic tool. Based upon the success of training rats to detect land mines, APOPO began testing rats to detect TB. In 2009, they published conclusive results on training rats to detect TB and replicated the success in 2010. The Tuberculosis detection rats screen the sputum of patients every year collected from TB clinics. As a result, many TB patients which were misdiagnosed by hospitals as negative are now identified and can be cured quickly. The WHO estimates that each TB patient can spread it to up to 10 others, so speed and scale of APOPO’s program curbs the spread and increased detection by 31.4%. In 2013, HeroRATs detected over 2,300 patients, potentially preventing 23,000 new TB infections per year. LEARN MORE.

[su_quote cite=”Dr. Negussie Beyene, Program Director” class=”top5″]The success of APOPO’s TB program warrants expansion to the dozens of countries around the world that suffer from a high TB burden. APOPO plans to expand to Cambodia in 2014 and possibly Zambia in 2015. Other regions of Tanzania and Mozambique are also being evaluated for expansion in either high or low prevalence populations. [/su_quote]


[su_divider]

Friends of the Old
Solar Cookers International
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING There were 419 documented cases of E. coli, typhoid, and other water-borne diseases from contaminated drinking water sources in Lower Nyakach, Kenya in one month in 2012. Disease is a threat, yet testing for waterborne illness is not always performed. 60% of this population lives in abject poverty, making treatment of diseases difficult. Lastly, the elderly make up 5% of the national population but contribute 50% in care and support for orphans and vulnerable children.

[su_pullquote align=”right” class=”top5″]Friends of the Old
Program Name

Lower Nyakach, Kenya
Location

2005
Start date

Dinah Chienjo
Program Director

@solarcookersint[/su_pullquote]

Friends of the Old (FOTO) seeks to improve the living conditions of senior citizens and orphaned children in Lower Nyakach, Kenya. Its priority is to eliminate waterborne diseases by promoting use of Portable Microbiology Laboratory. Households are provided Safe Water Packages that include a solar cooker, improved cookstove, water pasteurization indicator, retained-heat cooker, safe water jar that helps them escape the cycle of poverty through significant savings on household cooking and water pasteurization fuel. Lastly, the community is trained on how to use the devices and educated regarding water safety and hygiene, a proven method to reduce water-borne diseases. 2012 and 2013 statistics in Lower Nyakach Kenya show a significant reduction (79%) in cases of diarrhea after water education and treatment. LEARN MORE.

[su_quote cite=”Grace Okang, 85, Safe Water Package recipient” class=”top5″]My grandchildren put food on the CooKit for me to eat, and it has never failed to cook. I cannot walk much because of my age but am happy that this has made my life easier. [/su_quote]
[su_divider]

DKT Ethiopia
DKT International
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING HIV prevalence in Ethiopia skyrocketed from 1% in 1989 to 5.2% in 1996. Contraceptives were not readily available and, where they were available, very expensive. Today, the stigma surrounding condoms, family planning, birth control and abortion in Ethiopia contributes to the relatively high unmet need for family planning: 26.3% of married women want to use family planning but cannot access it.

[su_pullquote align=”right” class=”top5″]DKT Ethiopia
Program Name

Ethiopia
Location

1990
Start date

Andrew Piller
Program Director

@DKTchangeslives[/su_pullquote]

DKT Ethiopia provides a variety of contraceptives through innovative social marketing to prevent HIV and unwanted pregnancies, and ensures a consistent supply of high quality contraceptives and other health products in urban and rural areas. The program produces mass education and behavior change campaigns to increase use of family planning and HIV prevention. DKT started Young Marketers as an initiative to use youth clubs to sell condoms and other health products. YMs sell products to participating clubs, who resell them on a commission basis in their communities. YM has become an integral part of DKT/E’s condom distribution strategy, accounting for 43% of all condoms distributed in 2013. DKT now provides 50% of the condoms to Ethiopia; between 2001 and 2011, the number of new HIV infections in Ethiopia fell by 90%, according to UNAIDS. Recently, Bill & Melinda Gates’ Impatient Optimists blog highlighted DKT Ethiopia as a part of Ethiopia’s family planning success story. LEARN MORE.

[su_quote cite=”Andrew Piller, Program Director” class=”top5″]DKT Ethiopia is mission oriented and has a clear focus. That, combined with flexibility and a lack of bureaucracy, allows us to be efficient and effective in programming. [/su_quote]
[su_divider]

Let’s Finish Aids
Blood: Water Mission
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING Though the adult HIV prevalence rate in Kenya was reduced from 7.2% to 5.6% between 2007 and 2012, in Nyanza Province the HIV prevalence rate rose from 14.9% to 15.1%. Since 1990, life expectancy in the area has dropped from 49 years to 40 years, due to regional prevalence of HIV, poor health infrastructure, low female education rates, low rates of male circumcision, and the custom of polygamy.

[su_pullquote align=”right” class=”top5″]Let’s Finish Aids
Program Name

Lwala, Migori County in Nyanza Province, Kenya
Location

2007
Start date

Nadia Kist
Regional Partner Manager, HIV/AIDS

@bloodwater[/su_pullquote]

Let’s Finish Aids improves the quality and availability of comprehensive HIV/AIDS health care and support services for individuals living with HIV in Lwala, Kenya, by building the skill level of Lwala Community Hospital staff to provide quality HIV services, funding the provision of clinical and psychosocial HIV services, and strengthening LCA as a Kenyan civil society organization. By building and maintaining a rural hospital, the project has effectively provided access to primary healthcare for 20,000 people in a hard to reach, heavily HIV affected region. Each month, the Lwala Community Hospital cares for more than 2,800, including more than 1,000 HIV positive clients. The impact of the Hospital’s flagship maternal and child health program has led to an increase from 26% to 96% in facility-based birth rates in Lwala (between 2010-2013), which has cut neo-natal mortality in half in the area. Supported by Robert F. Kennedy Center, Lwala Community Hospital has been granted iPods and iPads loaded with the Skyscape medical app to support clinicians and community health workers. The staff utilizes the mobile health technologies to access medical reference resources and patient education modules. LEARN MORE.

[su_quote cite=”Nadia Kist, Program Director” class=”top5″]Our goal now is to ensure that no baby is born HIV+ by ensuring that 100% of the HIV+ pregnant women visiting a health facility receive comprehensive care right from pregnancy to delivery, and to the exposed infant care up to two years. [/su_quote]


The Lwala Community Hospital was granted iPods and iPads loaded with the Skyscape medical reference app to support clinicians and community health workers. The staff utilizes the mobile health technologies to access medical reference resources and patient education modules.
[su_divider]

Malaria Net Distributions
NETwork Against Malaria
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING In Uganda malaria is the number one cause of death, responsible for 50% of all deaths of school aged children. It causes anemia, mental retardation and developmental delays. Students who get malaria 1+ times a year miss up to 30 school days. Malaria nets (ITNs) prevent malaria, but children in Katulikire cannot afford them.

[su_pullquote align=”right” class=”top5″]Malaria Net Distributions
Program Name

Katulikire, Uganda
Location

2007
Start date

Mary Claire McGlynn
Program Director

[/su_pullquote]

NETwork works to prevent malaria, rather than treat it. A study in Rwanda found that after nets were distributed, malaria cases, admissions and deaths decreased by 50% in district hospitals and households. Although ITNs are effective, studies show many adults who receive ITNs without education do not use them. A study in Uganda showed only 62% of households with an ITN use it. A study in Ghana showed that educating school children about causes and methods of prevention of malaria led to increased awareness among children and adults. Usage increased among adults with nets after the study, thus NETwork is based off the idea that school children are effective agents of change for the community. Before distributing nets, NETwork determines the culture and size of the school to create culturally sensitive programming. Presentations are conducted in English and the local languages, and students then bring the nets home and teach their families. On average, NETwork distributes 9,000 nets to 9 schools each year. LEARN MORE.

[su_quote cite=”Mary Claire McGlynn, Program Director” class=”top5″]We have started to see long term outcomes of our work with increased enrollment in schools and parents enrolling their children with hopes that they will receive a net. With this, we’ve seen decreased absences and and decreased clinic visits for malaria. [/su_quote]
[su_divider]

The Health Experts

The Leadership Council is an honorary board comprised of a diverse group of experts that will collectively determine the winners of the CLASSY Awards in this cause sector. Their unique perspective and valuable insight establishes this recognition as one of the highest honors in the social sector.

LC_health-2
[su_divider]
Photo credit: APOPO

Where social entrepreneurs go to learn and grow

Join over 20,000 leaders just like you who get their weekly dose of technology, innovation, fundraising ideas, and the latest industry trends.

Subscribe to the Classy Blog