Levi Ammundsen

Freedom: Long Road
  • My Goal:
  • $25,000
  • Raised So Far:
  • $2,200
  • # of Donations:
  • 22
$2200 of $25000 goal
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It is difficult to get a clear picture of the state of human rights in North Korea.  The official stance of the government is that there are none: the socialist system was chosen by the people of North Korea, and serves them faithfully.  Foreigners and aid workers visiting the country are restricted to certain areas and are escorted to prevent them from discussing forbidden topics with the locals. 

However, the reports of refugees tell a far grimmer story than the offical party line. 

The only media that North Koreans are permitted to is that operated by the government.  Common citizens are forbidden from owning or operating vehicles due to the massive fuel shortage in the country.  Commerce is heavily restricted in the socialist system, and official food rations often fall far short of the population's requirements.

The North Korean justice system is based heavily on the death penalty and a series of prison camps.  Punishable offenses include altering a radio to recieve foreign broadcasts, verbally opposing the government, illegal religious beliefs (including all forms of christianity), attempting to leathe the country, and merely being related to a person found guilty of any of those crimes.

Current estimates from satellite photos place the camps at between 150,000 and 200,000 prisoners, including large numbers of children.  Those who have been released from or escaped these camps report horrific conditions, with pandemic malnutrition responsible for the death of aproximately 40% of all prisoners interned.  Others die from torture, execution, or industrial accidents while doing the slave labour that every prisoner is forced to participate in.

Those who want to escape the country for good must complete a harrowing journey across the northen border of North Korea, then travel thousands of kilometers through China to reach safe haven in Southeast Asia.  Any refugees caught by the Chinese government are deported back to North Korea, where they are imprisoned and tortured for their "treason".  Despite this, thousands of North Koreans have crossed the border into China and now live in constant fear of discovery because they cannot afford the long journey to safety.  They live as illegal "non-persons" in China and are brutally exploited.

This situation has led to the creation of a modern-day underground railway, a network of native North Koreans and Chinese, as well as interested foreigners dedicated to securing safe passage for the refugees into receptive foreign countries.

LiNK has already funded the escape of dozens of North Korean refugees.  With your help, I would like to see another ten (or more) given a chance at life free from North Korean tyranny.


Thank you,

--Levi Ammundsen

Follow my journey from the frozen north to who-knows-where at my blog: Freedom is a Long Road

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Levi Ammundsen is fundraising for General Donations benefiting Liberty in North Korea.

It is difficult to get a clear picture of the state of human rights in North Korea.  The official stance of the government is that there are none: the socialist system was chosen by the people of North Korea, and serves them faithfully.  Foreigners and aid workers visiting the country are restricted to certain areas and are escorted to prevent them from discussing forbidden topics with the locals. 

However, the reports of refugees tell a far grimmer story than the offical party line. 

The only media that North Koreans are permitted to is that operated by the government.  Common citizens are forbidden from owning or operating vehicles due to the massive fuel shortage in the country.  Commerce is heavily restricted in the socialist system, and official food rations often fall far short of the population's requirements.

The North Korean justice system is based heavily on the death penalty and a series of prison camps.  Punishable offenses include altering a radio to recieve foreign broadcasts, verbally opposing the government, illegal religious beliefs (including all forms of christianity), attempting to leathe the country, and merely being related to a person found guilty of any of those crimes.

Current estimates from satellite photos place the camps at between 150,000 and 200,000 prisoners, including large numbers of children.  Those who have been released from or escaped these camps report horrific conditions, with pandemic malnutrition responsible for the death of aproximately 40% of all prisoners interned.  Others die from torture, execution, or industrial accidents while doing the slave labour that every prisoner is forced to participate in.

Those who want to escape the country for good must complete a harrowing journey across the northen border of North Korea, then travel thousands of kilometers through China to reach safe haven in Southeast Asia.  Any refugees caught by the Chinese government are deported back to North Korea, where they are imprisoned and tortured for their "treason".  Despite this, thousands of North Koreans have crossed the border into China and now live in constant fear of discovery because they cannot afford the long journey to safety.  They live as illegal "non-persons" in China and are brutally exploited.

This situation has led to the creation of a modern-day underground railway, a network of native North Koreans and Chinese, as well as interested foreigners dedicated to securing safe passage for the refugees into receptive foreign countries.

LiNK has already funded the escape of dozens of North Korean refugees.  With your help, I would like to see another ten (or more) given a chance at life free from North Korean tyranny.


Thank you,

--Levi Ammundsen

Follow my journey from the frozen north to who-knows-where at my blog: Freedom is a Long Road

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Liberty in North Korea

The North Korean people are overcoming one of the greatest challenges facing humanity today. We're w...

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