Jarrod Cady

Jarrod
  • My Goal:
  • $2,000
  • Raised So Far:
  • $2,260
  • # of Donations:
  • 15
$2260 of $2000 goal
+
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I’m participating in an event called Dam That Cancer, travelling 21 miles from Mansfield Dam to the Tom Miller Dam (by Hula Hut in Austin) on a paddle board in support of The Flatwater Foundation, an organization that funds counseling to patients and their families going through a cancer diagnosis.

 

The Start

When I signed up for this, I was excited because it was a fitness challenge, it seemed like it would be fun, and it was in support of a family friend’s non-profit organization. I hadn’t been directly impacted by a cancer diagnosis. I hadn’t lost anyone immediately close to me; only distant friends, friends of friends, or acquaintances. I knew it was a hard thing to go through, and people needed support, but I didn’t know just how true that was; I didn’t know how personal the challenge would become.

 

Close to Home

Shortly after applying to participate in Dam That Cancer, I received a call from my mother telling me that my dad had been diagnosed with an aggressive form of lymphoma. They were going to have to operate as soon as possible, removing multiple lymph nodes in his neck and face area, leaving an incision that starts from the top of his ear, and travels half way down his neck. When they operated, they knew they would not get it all, and due to the aggressive nature of the cancer, they would have to immediately start both radiation and chemotherapy. My parents travel 50 miles, one way, five days a week for his radiation, with five hour chemo treatments every three weeks. He receives his second chemo treatment tomorrow.

 

Even More Real

Last Tuesday, my father in law was exhibiting signs of a stroke, so his son took him to the emergency room. After many tests, and finally an MRI, the doctors told the family it wasn’t a stroke; he had a brain tumor roughly the size of a racket ball. On Friday, they conducted a craniotomy (brain surgery), and were able to remove the vast majority of the tumor. As the doctors suspected, it was a malignant, cancerous tumor that had originated in the brain. They said that even though they got most of it, it would likely return, and they gave him 18-36 months to live. Unfortunately, after the surgery, he had a massive stroke, and they don’t expect him to survive the next 24 hours.

 

Our Support Structure

My wife and I are both the youngest of five children. All of the children are married, which doubles the size of the families, and our parents have an extensive network of family and friends. We both have excellent employers with very sympathetic leadership and coworkers. The point is that we have a support structure in place that would rival most out there. Not everyone has that.

 

The Ask (not what you think)

I’m not sharing this to solicit donations. You’re welcome to that if you choose. The link is below. I’m also not looking for sympathies for me; I’m not a big fan of personal attention (in fact, I struggled with sending this email at all), and as I mentioned, I have a large support network in place. I share it because cancer is a nasty animal, and it’s extremely difficult to handle. The people you know and love transform dramatically right in front of your eyes. I ask that if you know someone, even if it is a distant friend, a friend of a friend, or an acquaintance or coworker, who has been diagnosed or has a loved one who has been diagnosed, please reach out to them to offer your support. This last month has shown me that whether emotional or practical, big or small, it will be appreciated more than you may know. 

 

Thank you for reading,

Jarrod

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My Story
The Cause
Jarrod Cady is fundraising for TYLER'S Dam That Cancer 2017 benefiting Flatwater Foundation.

I’m participating in an event called Dam That Cancer, travelling 21 miles from Mansfield Dam to the Tom Miller Dam (by Hula Hut in Austin) on a paddle board in support of The Flatwater Foundation, an organization that funds counseling to patients and their families going through a cancer diagnosis.

 

The Start

When I signed up for this, I was excited because it was a fitness challenge, it seemed like it would be fun, and it was in support of a family friend’s non-profit organization. I hadn’t been directly impacted by a cancer diagnosis. I hadn’t lost anyone immediately close to me; only distant friends, friends of friends, or acquaintances. I knew it was a hard thing to go through, and people needed support, but I didn’t know just how true that was; I didn’t know how personal the challenge would become.

 

Close to Home

Shortly after applying to participate in Dam That Cancer, I received a call from my mother telling me that my dad had been diagnosed with an aggressive form of lymphoma. They were going to have to operate as soon as possible, removing multiple lymph nodes in his neck and face area, leaving an incision that starts from the top of his ear, and travels half way down his neck. When they operated, they knew they would not get it all, and due to the aggressive nature of the cancer, they would have to immediately start both radiation and chemotherapy. My parents travel 50 miles, one way, five days a week for his radiation, with five hour chemo treatments every three weeks. He receives his second chemo treatment tomorrow.

 

Even More Real

Last Tuesday, my father in law was exhibiting signs of a stroke, so his son took him to the emergency room. After many tests, and finally an MRI, the doctors told the family it wasn’t a stroke; he had a brain tumor roughly the size of a racket ball. On Friday, they conducted a craniotomy (brain surgery), and were able to remove the vast majority of the tumor. As the doctors suspected, it was a malignant, cancerous tumor that had originated in the brain. They said that even though they got most of it, it would likely return, and they gave him 18-36 months to live. Unfortunately, after the surgery, he had a massive stroke, and they don’t expect him to survive the next 24 hours.

 

Our Support Structure

My wife and I are both the youngest of five children. All of the children are married, which doubles the size of the families, and our parents have an extensive network of family and friends. We both have excellent employers with very sympathetic leadership and coworkers. The point is that we have a support structure in place that would rival most out there. Not everyone has that.

 

The Ask (not what you think)

I’m not sharing this to solicit donations. You’re welcome to that if you choose. The link is below. I’m also not looking for sympathies for me; I’m not a big fan of personal attention (in fact, I struggled with sending this email at all), and as I mentioned, I have a large support network in place. I share it because cancer is a nasty animal, and it’s extremely difficult to handle. The people you know and love transform dramatically right in front of your eyes. I ask that if you know someone, even if it is a distant friend, a friend of a friend, or an acquaintance or coworker, who has been diagnosed or has a loved one who has been diagnosed, please reach out to them to offer your support. This last month has shown me that whether emotional or practical, big or small, it will be appreciated more than you may know. 

 

Thank you for reading,

Jarrod

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About

My Team:

Team Jellison/Cady
$8,092 Raised
3 Team Members

The Campaign:

TYLER'S Dam That Cancer 2017

TYLER'S Dam That Cancer is the premier fundraising event for The Flatwater Foundation, a non-profit

The Organization:

Flatwater Foundation

Flatwater Foundation is dedicated to providing those diagnosed with cancer, their families and loved...

Fundraisers